California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Role of Pectic enzymes on softening in canned apricots

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

B. S. Luh, University of California
L. Y. Peupier, University of California
Y. K. Liu, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(7):4-6.

Published July 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: FUNGAL CONTAMINATION with Bysso-chlamys fulva has been reported to be responsible for softening of canned apricots in South Africa. In Australia, apricot softening was attributed to the slow action of a heat-resistant pectic enzyme produced by the mold Rhizopus stolonifer. The softening was thought to be due to mold contamination in the orchard or following mechanical damage during post-harvest handling.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Role of Pectic enzymes on softening in canned apricots

B. S. Luh, L. Y. Peupier, Y. K. Liu
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Role of Pectic enzymes on softening in canned apricots

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

B. S. Luh, University of California
L. Y. Peupier, University of California
Y. K. Liu, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(7):4-6.

Published July 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: FUNGAL CONTAMINATION with Bysso-chlamys fulva has been reported to be responsible for softening of canned apricots in South Africa. In Australia, apricot softening was attributed to the slow action of a heat-resistant pectic enzyme produced by the mold Rhizopus stolonifer. The softening was thought to be due to mold contamination in the orchard or following mechanical damage during post-harvest handling.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu