California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Control of Ramularia leafspot of strawberry

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Authors

A. O. Paulus, University of California
N. Welch
V. Voth, University of California
R. S. Bringhurst, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(6):5-6.

Published June 01, 1974

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Abstract

Benomyl or thiophanate-methyl applied as dips to strawberry nursery plants before planting provided significantly better control of Ramularia leafspot than all other materials tested. Benomyl in southern California and thiophanate-methyl or benomyl in northern California gave the best leafspot control when fungicides were applied as sprays after planting. Selecting leafspot-free plants or obtaining plants from nurseries following a benomyl spray program prevented leafspot developing in fields in southern California. Most fungicides tested were either phytotoxic or gave ineffective control of leafspot.

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Control of Ramularia leafspot of strawberry

A. O. Paulus, N. Welch, V. Voth, R. S. Bringhurst
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Control of Ramularia leafspot of strawberry

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

A. O. Paulus, University of California
N. Welch
V. Voth, University of California
R. S. Bringhurst, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(6):5-6.

Published June 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Benomyl or thiophanate-methyl applied as dips to strawberry nursery plants before planting provided significantly better control of Ramularia leafspot than all other materials tested. Benomyl in southern California and thiophanate-methyl or benomyl in northern California gave the best leafspot control when fungicides were applied as sprays after planting. Selecting leafspot-free plants or obtaining plants from nurseries following a benomyl spray program prevented leafspot developing in fields in southern California. Most fungicides tested were either phytotoxic or gave ineffective control of leafspot.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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