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The module system for storing and handling seed cotton

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Authors

R. A. Kepner, Davis
R. G. Curley, Davis
M. Hoover
L. K. Stromberg

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(5):6-9.

Published May 01, 1974

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Abstract

The study reported here indicates that total picker-to-gin costs per bale can be significantly lower with the module system than with the conventional trailer system or ricking. If a grower already has trailers, the module system requires considerably more additional investment in equipment than the ricking system. But modules can be taken from the field immediately and are then available for ginning whenever needed. Storing part of the seed cotton between picking and ginning allows growers to continue picking whenever the weather is favorable, even though the gins may not be able to keep up. Seed cotton storage usually reduces ginning costs, and a gin's seasonal capacity is increased by being able to operate more hours per year.

Full text

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Author notes

This study was partially supported by a grant from Cotton Incorporated.

The module system for storing and handling seed cotton

R. A. Kepner, R. G. Curley, M. Hoover, L. K. Stromberg
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

The module system for storing and handling seed cotton

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

R. A. Kepner, Davis
R. G. Curley, Davis
M. Hoover
L. K. Stromberg

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(5):6-9.

Published May 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

The study reported here indicates that total picker-to-gin costs per bale can be significantly lower with the module system than with the conventional trailer system or ricking. If a grower already has trailers, the module system requires considerably more additional investment in equipment than the ricking system. But modules can be taken from the field immediately and are then available for ginning whenever needed. Storing part of the seed cotton between picking and ginning allows growers to continue picking whenever the weather is favorable, even though the gins may not be able to keep up. Seed cotton storage usually reduces ginning costs, and a gin's seasonal capacity is increased by being able to operate more hours per year.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This study was partially supported by a grant from Cotton Incorporated.


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