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Effects of various: Iron treatments on lemon trees

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Authors

R. M. Burns
S. Oliva
G. Ming

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(1):14-15.

Published January 01, 1974

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Abstract

Applications of iron to the soil, or in the irrigation water, have generally not been commercially satisfactory for treating iron deficiencies in lemon trees. Foliar sprays of available iron materials presently show the most promise. In one large-scale trial on mature lemons near Oxnard, yearly low-volume sprays of three iron compounds have shown increases in yield and fruit size. Leaf analysis for iron was found to be a poor indicator of response. A completely satisfactory method of correcting iron deficiency in lemons is still not available.

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Author notes

Kenneth Gray, ITT Rayonier, Shelton, Washington; James Davis, Lefingwell Chemical, Santa Paula; James McKelvie, Niagara Chemical, Santa Paula; Robert Austin, Geigy-CIBA, Los Angeles, and Robert Needham, Pacific Pest Control, El RW, California, supplied chemicals and assisted with these trials. U.C. Agricultural Extension Soils and Water Specialist Roy Branson assisted with the manuscript, and Farm Advisor Robert Brendler provided statistical assistance.

Effects of various: Iron treatments on lemon trees

R. M. Burns, S. Oliva, G. Ming
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Effects of various: Iron treatments on lemon trees

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

R. M. Burns
S. Oliva
G. Ming

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(1):14-15.

Published January 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Applications of iron to the soil, or in the irrigation water, have generally not been commercially satisfactory for treating iron deficiencies in lemon trees. Foliar sprays of available iron materials presently show the most promise. In one large-scale trial on mature lemons near Oxnard, yearly low-volume sprays of three iron compounds have shown increases in yield and fruit size. Leaf analysis for iron was found to be a poor indicator of response. A completely satisfactory method of correcting iron deficiency in lemons is still not available.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Kenneth Gray, ITT Rayonier, Shelton, Washington; James Davis, Lefingwell Chemical, Santa Paula; James McKelvie, Niagara Chemical, Santa Paula; Robert Austin, Geigy-CIBA, Los Angeles, and Robert Needham, Pacific Pest Control, El RW, California, supplied chemicals and assisted with these trials. U.C. Agricultural Extension Soils and Water Specialist Roy Branson assisted with the manuscript, and Farm Advisor Robert Brendler provided statistical assistance.


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