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Chaparral shrub control as influenced by grazing, herbicides and fire

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Authors

Alfred H. Murphy, University of California
Oliver A. Leonard, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(1):10-13.

Published January 01, 1974

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Abstract

Best control of chaparral shrubs on range-land at Hopland Field Station has been achieved with the use of herbicides. In both grazed and ungrazed areas, chemical control reduced the brush to less than 1% of the plant cover within four years and maintained a very low level for the 14-year period of the experiment. Grazing without other controls had little influence on the results, except for a re-occurrence of poison oak in ungrazed areas. Fire reduced the composition of brush for the first two years, but peaked out in the sixth year with a gradual decline thereafter.

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Chaparral shrub control as influenced by grazing, herbicides and fire

Alfred H. Murphy, Oliver A. Leonard
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Chaparral shrub control as influenced by grazing, herbicides and fire

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Alfred H. Murphy, University of California
Oliver A. Leonard, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(1):10-13.

Published January 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Best control of chaparral shrubs on range-land at Hopland Field Station has been achieved with the use of herbicides. In both grazed and ungrazed areas, chemical control reduced the brush to less than 1% of the plant cover within four years and maintained a very low level for the 14-year period of the experiment. Grazing without other controls had little influence on the results, except for a re-occurrence of poison oak in ungrazed areas. Fire reduced the composition of brush for the first two years, but peaked out in the sixth year with a gradual decline thereafter.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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