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Determination of fruit bearing zones in California citrus trees

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Authors

S. B. Boswell, Department of Plant Sciences, University of California
R. M. Burns, Department of Plant Sciences, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 27(12):3-5.

Published December 01, 1973

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Abstract

In almost every plot studied, most citrus fruit was produced on the south half of the tree. The exceptions were the navel and Valencia groves at Woodlake, where most fruit was produced on the east half of the tree. Of the fourteen plots counted, six showed that the southwest quadrant had significantly more fruit. These results indicate that maximum production would be obtained from trees planted so that any crowding or shading does not affect the south canopy. In most areas, crowding of the southwest quarter of the trees should be avoided, if possible. To expose the section of the tree with the most fruit-bearing capabilities, trees should either be planted far enough apart so that there is no crowding and shading, or close-set rows should be planted in an east-west direction. Best plantings theoretically, would be in rows from northwest to southeast, with trees in each row offset from the adjoining row.

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Determination of fruit bearing zones in California citrus trees

S. B. Boswell, R. M. Burns
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Determination of fruit bearing zones in California citrus trees

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

S. B. Boswell, Department of Plant Sciences, University of California
R. M. Burns, Department of Plant Sciences, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 27(12):3-5.

Published December 01, 1973

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

In almost every plot studied, most citrus fruit was produced on the south half of the tree. The exceptions were the navel and Valencia groves at Woodlake, where most fruit was produced on the east half of the tree. Of the fourteen plots counted, six showed that the southwest quadrant had significantly more fruit. These results indicate that maximum production would be obtained from trees planted so that any crowding or shading does not affect the south canopy. In most areas, crowding of the southwest quarter of the trees should be avoided, if possible. To expose the section of the tree with the most fruit-bearing capabilities, trees should either be planted far enough apart so that there is no crowding and shading, or close-set rows should be planted in an east-west direction. Best plantings theoretically, would be in rows from northwest to southeast, with trees in each row offset from the adjoining row.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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