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California wine grape acreage: Projecting effects of new San Joaquin and coastal plantings

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Authors

Kirby S. Moulton , University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 27(4):3-5.

Published April 01, 1973

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Abstract

If estimated intentions are achieved in 1973, new wine grape plantings should equal 51,300 acres. Under average conditions, the grape supply represented by this acreage probably can be absorbed in 1977 wine and brandy production if demand growth rates continue at about the level of 1972. However, if the demand growth rate continues to decline as noticed between 1971 and 1972, then a surplus of grapes relative to crush needs is possible in 1976. A careful look at specific grape varieties is also desirable because if market demand for wine continues to change in its characteristics, then not all grape varieties will fare equally well in future markets.

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California wine grape acreage: Projecting effects of new San Joaquin and coastal plantings

Kirby S. Moulton
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

California wine grape acreage: Projecting effects of new San Joaquin and coastal plantings

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Kirby S. Moulton , University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 27(4):3-5.

Published April 01, 1973

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

If estimated intentions are achieved in 1973, new wine grape plantings should equal 51,300 acres. Under average conditions, the grape supply represented by this acreage probably can be absorbed in 1977 wine and brandy production if demand growth rates continue at about the level of 1972. However, if the demand growth rate continues to decline as noticed between 1971 and 1972, then a surplus of grapes relative to crush needs is possible in 1976. A careful look at specific grape varieties is also desirable because if market demand for wine continues to change in its characteristics, then not all grape varieties will fare equally well in future markets.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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