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Temperature and air pollution effects on early fruit production of F1 tomato hybrids

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Authors

J. W. Lesley, Department of Plant Sciences
O. Clifton Taylor, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 27(2):13-14.

Published February 01, 1973

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Early fruit setting of tomatoes in experimental plots at Riverside, California, has been light in recent years. Unfavorable temperatures in late spring are a probable cause, but increasing atmospheric pollutants may also be involved since phytotoxic levels of total oxidants occur frequently in this area.

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Author notes

Suspensions of Fusarium lycopersici and Verticillium alboatrum for this study were provided by Professor Stephen Wilhelm, Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Berkeley.

Temperature and air pollution effects on early fruit production of F1 tomato hybrids

J. W. Lesley, O. Clifton Taylor
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Temperature and air pollution effects on early fruit production of F1 tomato hybrids

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

J. W. Lesley, Department of Plant Sciences
O. Clifton Taylor, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 27(2):13-14.

Published February 01, 1973

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Early fruit setting of tomatoes in experimental plots at Riverside, California, has been light in recent years. Unfavorable temperatures in late spring are a probable cause, but increasing atmospheric pollutants may also be involved since phytotoxic levels of total oxidants occur frequently in this area.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Suspensions of Fusarium lycopersici and Verticillium alboatrum for this study were provided by Professor Stephen Wilhelm, Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Berkeley.


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