California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Climate effects on navel oranges

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

E. M. Nauer, University of California, Riverside
J. H. Goodale, University of California
L. L. Summers, University of California
Walter Reuther, University of California, Riverside

Publication Information

California Agriculture 26(11):8-11.

Published November 01, 1972

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California markets fresh oranges every week of the year, and yet grows only two varieties. This is made possible by (1) holding the fruit on the tree after it reaches legal maturity, (2) storing the fruit after picking, and (3) taking advantage of the different maturity dates in different climatic zones. The range and types of variations in fruit maturity and quality due to climatic differences in California have not yet been carefully studied and extensively reported.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Valuable assistance was provided by R. L. Blue, D. C. Elfving, C. N. Roistacher, and R. L. Wagner.

Climate effects on navel oranges

E. M. Nauer, J. H. Goodale, L. L. Summers, Walter Reuther
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Climate effects on navel oranges

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

E. M. Nauer, University of California, Riverside
J. H. Goodale, University of California
L. L. Summers, University of California
Walter Reuther, University of California, Riverside

Publication Information

California Agriculture 26(11):8-11.

Published November 01, 1972

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: California markets fresh oranges every week of the year, and yet grows only two varieties. This is made possible by (1) holding the fruit on the tree after it reaches legal maturity, (2) storing the fruit after picking, and (3) taking advantage of the different maturity dates in different climatic zones. The range and types of variations in fruit maturity and quality due to climatic differences in California have not yet been carefully studied and extensively reported.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Valuable assistance was provided by R. L. Blue, D. C. Elfving, C. N. Roistacher, and R. L. Wagner.


University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu