California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Ancymidol applications retard plant growth of woody ornamentals

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Tok Furuta, University of California, Riverside
W. Clay Jones, Research Associate, University of California, Riverside
Tom Mock, Research Associate, South Coast Field Station
Wesley Humphrey
Richard Maire
James Breece

Publication Information

California Agriculture 26(3):10-12.

Published March 01, 1972

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Ancymidol was found to be effective in retarding growth of many plant species and cultivars. It was effective on woody and herbaceous species. It appears that this new chemical has a wide latitude of safety on most plants. However, some objectionable effects were observed—which may be partly the result of the high dosages used for this series of experiments. Ancymidol is not registered for use at this time, and is not recommended by the University of California.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Ancymidol applications retard plant growth of woody ornamentals

Tok Furuta, W. Clay Jones, Tom Mock, Wesley Humphrey, Richard Maire, James Breece
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Ancymidol applications retard plant growth of woody ornamentals

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Tok Furuta, University of California, Riverside
W. Clay Jones, Research Associate, University of California, Riverside
Tom Mock, Research Associate, South Coast Field Station
Wesley Humphrey
Richard Maire
James Breece

Publication Information

California Agriculture 26(3):10-12.

Published March 01, 1972

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Ancymidol was found to be effective in retarding growth of many plant species and cultivars. It was effective on woody and herbaceous species. It appears that this new chemical has a wide latitude of safety on most plants. However, some objectionable effects were observed—which may be partly the result of the high dosages used for this series of experiments. Ancymidol is not registered for use at this time, and is not recommended by the University of California.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu