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California Agriculture
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Chemically induced sprouting of axillary buds in avocados

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Authors

C. D. McCarty, University of California
S. B. Boswell, University of California
R. M. Burns, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(12):4-5.

Published December 01, 1971

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Applications of TIBA (trüodobenzoic acid) have broken terminal dominance, and caused sprouting and growth of axillary buds in young avocado trees without killing the terminal shoot which continues to grow at a reduced rate. This chemical may offer a way to alter the marked upright growth of varieties such as Zutano and Bacon into a more desirable spreading-scaffold branch structure.

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Chemically induced sprouting of axillary buds in avocados

C. D. McCarty, S. B. Boswell, R. M. Burns
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Chemically induced sprouting of axillary buds in avocados

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

C. D. McCarty, University of California
S. B. Boswell, University of California
R. M. Burns, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(12):4-5.

Published December 01, 1971

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Applications of TIBA (trüodobenzoic acid) have broken terminal dominance, and caused sprouting and growth of axillary buds in young avocado trees without killing the terminal shoot which continues to grow at a reduced rate. This chemical may offer a way to alter the marked upright growth of varieties such as Zutano and Bacon into a more desirable spreading-scaffold branch structure.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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