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California Agriculture
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A progress report… dates of planting for asparagus production

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Authors

F. H. Takatori, University of California
J. I. Stillman, University of California
F. D. Souther, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(12):14-15.

Published December 01, 1971

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Abstract

These tests show that a good initial stand of asparagus can be obtained through direct seeding from early spring to late summer; however, the final established stand was dependent upon the cultural practice following the first season of growth. Plantings made in July or later, in warm production areas such as southern California, do not gain sufficient size during the first season to permit covering with soil before the second season. The production of marketable spears from one-year-old plants was limited, and it appeared that this reduction in quality may be carried over into subsequent harvest seasons.

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A progress report… dates of planting for asparagus production

F. H. Takatori, J. I. Stillman, F. D. Souther
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

A progress report… dates of planting for asparagus production

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

F. H. Takatori, University of California
J. I. Stillman, University of California
F. D. Souther, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(12):14-15.

Published December 01, 1971

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

These tests show that a good initial stand of asparagus can be obtained through direct seeding from early spring to late summer; however, the final established stand was dependent upon the cultural practice following the first season of growth. Plantings made in July or later, in warm production areas such as southern California, do not gain sufficient size during the first season to permit covering with soil before the second season. The production of marketable spears from one-year-old plants was limited, and it appeared that this reduction in quality may be carried over into subsequent harvest seasons.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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