California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Field bindweed control in vineyards

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. Douglas Hamilton
A. H. Lange, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center
C. L. Elmore, University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(9):9-10.

Published September 01, 1971

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) is a widespread problem in coastal vineyards of central and northern California. Field trials by the Agricultural Extension Service since 1963 have compared several formulations, rates, and timing of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) sprays. Wax bars impregnated with 2,4-D have also been tried. None of the treatments in these trials have given commercial season-long control (table 1).

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Wente Vineyards, Livermore, cooperated.

Field bindweed control in vineyards

W. Douglas Hamilton, A. H. Lange, C. L. Elmore
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Field bindweed control in vineyards

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. Douglas Hamilton
A. H. Lange, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center
C. L. Elmore, University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(9):9-10.

Published September 01, 1971

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) is a widespread problem in coastal vineyards of central and northern California. Field trials by the Agricultural Extension Service since 1963 have compared several formulations, rates, and timing of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) sprays. Wax bars impregnated with 2,4-D have also been tried. None of the treatments in these trials have given commercial season-long control (table 1).

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Wente Vineyards, Livermore, cooperated.


University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu