California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Controlling fanleaf virus…dagger nematode disease complex in vineyards by soil fumigation

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

D. J. Raski, University of California, Davis
W. B. Hewitt, Extension Center, Parlier, California
R. V. Schmitt, University of California, Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(4):11-14.

Published April 01, 1971

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

High-rate, deep-placement applications of the soil fumigant, 1,3-D, have been successful over a 3-year test period in controlling both the nematode vector, Xiphinema index, and the fanleaf-yellow mosaic virus disease of grapevines. A 250-gal-per-acre application rate appears to be necessary, especially on heavy soils, until results of trials with lower rates have been evaluated. Recent commercial applications of methyl bromide under continuous polyethylene sheeting indicate a good potential for control of fanleaf virus-dagger nematode disease; however, preliminary tests show that shallow applications do not give satisfactory control in the deeper layers of soil. Further tests are underway to improve the effectiveness of this material.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This work has been possible by the cooperation of many vineyardists including Christian Bros., Napa; George Guglielmo, Morgan Hill; and Karl Wente and Joseph Concannon, Livermore. The Shell Chemical Company provided the fumigants used in these experiments. Many members of the University of California Agricultural Extension Service also assisted, including W. H. Hart, Rudy Neja, John Joos and Douglas Hamilton.

Controlling fanleaf virus…dagger nematode disease complex in vineyards by soil fumigation

D. J. Raski, W. B. Hewitt, R. V. Schmitt
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Controlling fanleaf virus…dagger nematode disease complex in vineyards by soil fumigation

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

D. J. Raski, University of California, Davis
W. B. Hewitt, Extension Center, Parlier, California
R. V. Schmitt, University of California, Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 25(4):11-14.

Published April 01, 1971

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

High-rate, deep-placement applications of the soil fumigant, 1,3-D, have been successful over a 3-year test period in controlling both the nematode vector, Xiphinema index, and the fanleaf-yellow mosaic virus disease of grapevines. A 250-gal-per-acre application rate appears to be necessary, especially on heavy soils, until results of trials with lower rates have been evaluated. Recent commercial applications of methyl bromide under continuous polyethylene sheeting indicate a good potential for control of fanleaf virus-dagger nematode disease; however, preliminary tests show that shallow applications do not give satisfactory control in the deeper layers of soil. Further tests are underway to improve the effectiveness of this material.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This work has been possible by the cooperation of many vineyardists including Christian Bros., Napa; George Guglielmo, Morgan Hill; and Karl Wente and Joseph Concannon, Livermore. The Shell Chemical Company provided the fumigants used in these experiments. Many members of the University of California Agricultural Extension Service also assisted, including W. H. Hart, Rudy Neja, John Joos and Douglas Hamilton.


University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu