California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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Dryland agriculture in California… grain cropping with winter rainfall

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Authors

R. E. Luebs, USDA, Riverside

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(12):12-13.

Published December 01, 1970

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The terms dryland and dry farming are used in the United States to characterize agriculture existing on an average annual precipitation of from 10 to 20 inches. A high variability in the annual amount is common in these relatively low rainfall areas—less than half the longtime average can occasionally be expected. On the basis of seasonal water availability for vegetation, dryland farming extends from areas where economically useful vegetation is barely sustained, to areas where drought is only an intermittent problem.

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Dryland agriculture in California… grain cropping with winter rainfall

R. E. Luebs
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Dryland agriculture in California… grain cropping with winter rainfall

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

R. E. Luebs, USDA, Riverside

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(12):12-13.

Published December 01, 1970

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The terms dryland and dry farming are used in the United States to characterize agriculture existing on an average annual precipitation of from 10 to 20 inches. A high variability in the annual amount is common in these relatively low rainfall areas—less than half the longtime average can occasionally be expected. On the basis of seasonal water availability for vegetation, dryland farming extends from areas where economically useful vegetation is barely sustained, to areas where drought is only an intermittent problem.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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