California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Effects of TIBA growth regulator on open branching of citrus for mechanical shaking

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

S. B. Boswell, Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside
C. D. Mccarty, Agricultural Extension Service, U.C., Riverside

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(11):6-7.

Published November 01, 1970

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: SUCCESSFUL HARVESTING with mechanical shakers requires a tree with an open-spreading branch structure. A vase-like arrangement of three primary scaffold branches arising from the main trunk at a height of from 24 to 30 inches is ideal. The low, open-centered, spreading canopy thus formed allows fruit to fall to a catching frame with less chance of striking interfering branches.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Effects of TIBA growth regulator on open branching of citrus for mechanical shaking

S. B. Boswell, C. D. Mccarty
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Effects of TIBA growth regulator on open branching of citrus for mechanical shaking

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

S. B. Boswell, Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside
C. D. Mccarty, Agricultural Extension Service, U.C., Riverside

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(11):6-7.

Published November 01, 1970

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: SUCCESSFUL HARVESTING with mechanical shakers requires a tree with an open-spreading branch structure. A vase-like arrangement of three primary scaffold branches arising from the main trunk at a height of from 24 to 30 inches is ideal. The low, open-centered, spreading canopy thus formed allows fruit to fall to a catching frame with less chance of striking interfering branches.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu