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Antioxidants reduce grape yield reductions from photochemical smog

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Authors

C. R. Thompson, Statewide Air Pollution Research Center, University of California, Riverside
Gerrit Kats, Statewide Air Pollution Research Center, University of California, Riverside

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(9):12-13.

Published September 01, 1970

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: INJURY TO GRAPES by Los Angeles type (photochemical) smog was recognized as early as 1957. The component of this mixture which causes the most damage is ozone. A “stipple” condition of leaves characterized by small brown areas of dead cells develops where smog is heavy, usually in May or early June. As the season progresses these leaves turn bronze and drop. Some conifers develop a yellow mottle on the needles which progresses, with continued exposure to ozone, to severe chlorosis and defoliation. Citrus may develop irregular-shaped brown to black spots on the upper leaf suface.

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Author notes

This work was supported in part by the California Wine Advisory Board, the Cucamonga Winery co., San Bernardino County, Kaiser Steel Co., Fontana, and Sunkist, Inc.

Antioxidants reduce grape yield reductions from photochemical smog

C. R. Thompson, Gerrit Kats
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Antioxidants reduce grape yield reductions from photochemical smog

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

C. R. Thompson, Statewide Air Pollution Research Center, University of California, Riverside
Gerrit Kats, Statewide Air Pollution Research Center, University of California, Riverside

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(9):12-13.

Published September 01, 1970

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: INJURY TO GRAPES by Los Angeles type (photochemical) smog was recognized as early as 1957. The component of this mixture which causes the most damage is ozone. A “stipple” condition of leaves characterized by small brown areas of dead cells develops where smog is heavy, usually in May or early June. As the season progresses these leaves turn bronze and drop. Some conifers develop a yellow mottle on the needles which progresses, with continued exposure to ozone, to severe chlorosis and defoliation. Citrus may develop irregular-shaped brown to black spots on the upper leaf suface.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This work was supported in part by the California Wine Advisory Board, the Cucamonga Winery co., San Bernardino County, Kaiser Steel Co., Fontana, and Sunkist, Inc.


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