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Irrigation schedules and production of processed tomatoes on the San Joaquin Westside

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Authors

F. K. Aljibury, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Parlier
Donald May, Fresno County

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(8):10-11.

Published August 01, 1970

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Abstract

In processed tomatoes production of ripe fruit was significantly affected by irrigation schedules. Within the range of the test treatments, the longer the period between irrigations, the higher the percentage of ripe fruit and of solids. However, there was a highly significant reduction in yield and an increase in the amount of sunburn as the irrigation interval increased from 10 to 15 and 20 days. The 10-day irrigation cycle appeared to be the most suitable practice, yielding the highest tomato tonnage per acre, and consistent with the evapo transpiration and the gypsum block records. Longer irrigation frequencies depressed yield, stressed the tomato plants, and increased the percentage of sunburned fruits. Pre-irrigation is a very important practice in the production of tomatoes on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley.

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Irrigation schedules and production of processed tomatoes on the San Joaquin Westside

F. K. Aljibury, Donald May
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Irrigation schedules and production of processed tomatoes on the San Joaquin Westside

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

F. K. Aljibury, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Parlier
Donald May, Fresno County

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(8):10-11.

Published August 01, 1970

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

In processed tomatoes production of ripe fruit was significantly affected by irrigation schedules. Within the range of the test treatments, the longer the period between irrigations, the higher the percentage of ripe fruit and of solids. However, there was a highly significant reduction in yield and an increase in the amount of sunburn as the irrigation interval increased from 10 to 15 and 20 days. The 10-day irrigation cycle appeared to be the most suitable practice, yielding the highest tomato tonnage per acre, and consistent with the evapo transpiration and the gypsum block records. Longer irrigation frequencies depressed yield, stressed the tomato plants, and increased the percentage of sunburned fruits. Pre-irrigation is a very important practice in the production of tomatoes on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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