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Ethrel sprays reduce number of pickings in hand-harvested cantaloupes

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Authors

K. Tyler, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Reedley
D. May, Fresno County
R. Miller, Canning Machinery Division, FMC Corporation, Sun Jose

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(4):6-7.

Published April 01, 1970

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: MUCH OF OUR PRESENT RESEARCH effort is directed towards mechanizing the harvesting of our California vegetable crops. This is as true for cantaloupes as it is for asparagus, lettuce, and fresh market tomatoes. Agricultural engineers and plant scientists generally agree that mechanical harvesting of cantaloupes on a commercial scale is still several years in the future. The principal obstacle to machine harvesting of cantaloupes has been the absence of a variety which will mature fruit of acceptable quality in a determinate manner so that the crop can be harvested in a single once-over operation much the way canning tomatoes are harvested.

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Ethrel sprays reduce number of pickings in hand-harvested cantaloupes

K. Tyler, D. May, R. Miller
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Ethrel sprays reduce number of pickings in hand-harvested cantaloupes

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

K. Tyler, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Reedley
D. May, Fresno County
R. Miller, Canning Machinery Division, FMC Corporation, Sun Jose

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(4):6-7.

Published April 01, 1970

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: MUCH OF OUR PRESENT RESEARCH effort is directed towards mechanizing the harvesting of our California vegetable crops. This is as true for cantaloupes as it is for asparagus, lettuce, and fresh market tomatoes. Agricultural engineers and plant scientists generally agree that mechanical harvesting of cantaloupes on a commercial scale is still several years in the future. The principal obstacle to machine harvesting of cantaloupes has been the absence of a variety which will mature fruit of acceptable quality in a determinate manner so that the crop can be harvested in a single once-over operation much the way canning tomatoes are harvested.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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