California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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Corporate farming in California

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Authors

J. H. Snyder, U. C. Davis
C. V. Moore, Farm Production Economics Division, Economic Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, stationed at the University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(3):6-8.

Published March 01, 1970

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Abstract

Corporate farms tend to be larger, both in terms of acres of land operated and gross farm sales. California's farming corporations tend to concentrate in the intensive high-risk-capital enterprises. The rate of incorporation appears to have slowed considerably in the past three years. In the future, it is likely that existing corporations will expand the size of their present operations, along with some consolidation of smaller corporqtions through purchase by, or merger with, large diversified corporations. Also, as farms achieve a larger size, they will tend to adopt the corporate form of business organization.

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Corporate farming in California

J. H. Snyder, C. V. Moore
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Corporate farming in California

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

J. H. Snyder, U. C. Davis
C. V. Moore, Farm Production Economics Division, Economic Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, stationed at the University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 24(3):6-8.

Published March 01, 1970

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Corporate farms tend to be larger, both in terms of acres of land operated and gross farm sales. California's farming corporations tend to concentrate in the intensive high-risk-capital enterprises. The rate of incorporation appears to have slowed considerably in the past three years. In the future, it is likely that existing corporations will expand the size of their present operations, along with some consolidation of smaller corporqtions through purchase by, or merger with, large diversified corporations. Also, as farms achieve a larger size, they will tend to adopt the corporate form of business organization.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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