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Pesticides increase seed yields of late safflower

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Authors

Elmer C. Carlson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(12):4-5.

Published December 01, 1969

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Abstract

Pesticide applications have significantly increased safflower seed yields when treatments were made twice to late-planted, irrigated safflower. Severe bud damage and blasting often occurs because plant bloom and bud development is not underway until July or August, and the higher summer populations of lygus bugs and flower thrips feed on and injure the buds.

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Author notes

These studies were conducted under project 1565 with the assistance of John Campbell, Nurseryman at the Davis campus. Cooperators were: Dr. Paul F. Knowles, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, U.C., Davis; Pacific Oilseeds, Inc., Woodland, California; and several chemical companies which donated chemicals.

Pesticides increase seed yields of late safflower

Elmer C. Carlson
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Pesticides increase seed yields of late safflower

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Elmer C. Carlson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(12):4-5.

Published December 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Pesticide applications have significantly increased safflower seed yields when treatments were made twice to late-planted, irrigated safflower. Severe bud damage and blasting often occurs because plant bloom and bud development is not underway until July or August, and the higher summer populations of lygus bugs and flower thrips feed on and injure the buds.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

These studies were conducted under project 1565 with the assistance of John Campbell, Nurseryman at the Davis campus. Cooperators were: Dr. Paul F. Knowles, Department of Agronomy and Range Science, U.C., Davis; Pacific Oilseeds, Inc., Woodland, California; and several chemical companies which donated chemicals.


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