California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Chemical pinching for roots of container plants

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

James J. Nussbaum, Department of Environmental Horticulture

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(10):16-18.

Published October 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

A more branched, fibrous root system is possible by chemically pinching the roots of young container-grown nursery plants. Copper naphthenate painted on the bottom of the seedbed was effective and easy to use. Treated seedlings formed more lateral roots than untreated plants. Root pruning to prevent roots from being kinked and twisted when transplanted was minimized. This technique should be particularly adapted to taprooted plants.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

R. W. Harris advised on this study.

Chemical pinching for roots of container plants

James J. Nussbaum
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Chemical pinching for roots of container plants

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

James J. Nussbaum, Department of Environmental Horticulture

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(10):16-18.

Published October 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

A more branched, fibrous root system is possible by chemically pinching the roots of young container-grown nursery plants. Copper naphthenate painted on the bottom of the seedbed was effective and easy to use. Treated seedlings formed more lateral roots than untreated plants. Root pruning to prevent roots from being kinked and twisted when transplanted was minimized. This technique should be particularly adapted to taprooted plants.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

R. W. Harris advised on this study.


University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu