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California Agriculture
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Plastic shelters for crop growth experiments in the field

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Authors

V. H. Schweers
R. M. Davis, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(3):19-19.

Published March 01, 1969

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: SHELTERS ARE often necessary in experimental work with growing crops to protect research results from the influence of insects or insect-transmitted viruses or other diseases—without greatly altering the other important factors of environment such as light, soil and temperature. This article resulted from a study of the low sugar problem threatening cantaloupe production in several areas of the San Joaquin Valley. It describes a simple inexpensive framework covering a ground area 20 by 30 ft, and reports measurements of light, temperature and humidity within several such structures covered with various combinations of polyethylene and cheesecloth.

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Plastic shelters for crop growth experiments in the field

V. H. Schweers, R. M. Davis
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Plastic shelters for crop growth experiments in the field

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

V. H. Schweers
R. M. Davis, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(3):19-19.

Published March 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: SHELTERS ARE often necessary in experimental work with growing crops to protect research results from the influence of insects or insect-transmitted viruses or other diseases—without greatly altering the other important factors of environment such as light, soil and temperature. This article resulted from a study of the low sugar problem threatening cantaloupe production in several areas of the San Joaquin Valley. It describes a simple inexpensive framework covering a ground area 20 by 30 ft, and reports measurements of light, temperature and humidity within several such structures covered with various combinations of polyethylene and cheesecloth.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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