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Reinfection possibilities for angular leaf spot pathogen in California cotton

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Authors

W. C. Schnathorst, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(2):17-18.

Published February 01, 1969

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: ANGULAR LEAF SPOT of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas malvacearum, became established in California in about 1951. By 1962, however, sanitation had eradicated it from cotton fields, and attempts in 1966-67 to demonstrate cotton-gin-contamination failed even though contamination had been readily demonstrated in 1958-60, when the disease was widespread.

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Author notes

California Planting Cotton Seed Distributors, Bakersfield, cooperated in this study, and Barbara Koepsell gave technical assistance.

Reinfection possibilities for angular leaf spot pathogen in California cotton

W. C. Schnathorst
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Reinfection possibilities for angular leaf spot pathogen in California cotton

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

W. C. Schnathorst, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 23(2):17-18.

Published February 01, 1969

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: ANGULAR LEAF SPOT of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas malvacearum, became established in California in about 1951. By 1962, however, sanitation had eradicated it from cotton fields, and attempts in 1966-67 to demonstrate cotton-gin-contamination failed even though contamination had been readily demonstrated in 1958-60, when the disease was widespread.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

California Planting Cotton Seed Distributors, Bakersfield, cooperated in this study, and Barbara Koepsell gave technical assistance.


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